The Legendary River Drifters (LP Release/Farewell Show)

With Space in Time, Dirty Few, Reverend Deadeye, Chella Negro, Onemanna, Two Tone Wolf Pack and Dustin Reid!

at The Oriental Theater

November 10, 2012 7:30 pm - 1:00 am
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Time: 7:30pm     Day: Saturday     Doors: 7:00pm     Ages: 18+ / Bar with ID     Price: $7
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Showtimes

10:00 pm
The Legendary River Drifters
9:00 pm
Space in Time
9:00 pm
Reverend Deadeye
9:00 pm
DIrty Few
8:00 pm
Chella Negro
The Legendary River Drifters

The River Drifters formed four years ago out of a desire to play in a band whose members could win in a fight against any other local band. That's also why Suzanne took up the musical saw: to have easy access to a deadly weapon on stage. Joe Burkins got put on mandolin because he can play every instrument in the band better than the member playing that instrument. He had never played mandolin before, so we all voted and the mandolin is what we settled on. Cyrus said, "Let's see if he can play this retarded violin." Of course he could, and if he gets any better at it, we may have to switch him to slide whistle.

We're a folk group that veers into heavy metal sometimes. Matthew has a wheat intolerance. That's our main weakness, especially during beer drinking competitions, but Cyrus can drink his weight in beer, so that makes up for it. If Olivia exposed her breasts more, we all think we'd get better press. Darrick and Curtis both look a little like David Koresh, which is probably inhibiting us from getting national attention. We all remember the last time national attention turned to David Koresh.

Speaking of press, we stopped doing straight-faced interviews after we spoke to the Westword about the religious undertones in our music, and they labeled Suzanne a Catholic. She'll take whiskey over worship, as they say, and that's pretty evident in most of our songs, penned by Suzanne or not.

Space in Time

Space In Time set their time machine for 40 years into the future and stepped out into Denver, CO to bring forth their own brand of killer, ‘70s influenced, heavy rock and roll. Featuring Mike (vocal), Javram (guitar), Charile (bass), and Yancy (drums).

Space In Time’s first full length, self-titled debut was self-released in 2011. It contains 9 solid tracks of pure, blistering rock and roll, with Vaughn McPherson on the Hammond organ. Their second full length album, Rock and Roll, is due for release in September, 2013. Vaughn joins them on Rock and Roll as well, bringing to mind the harder side of Uriah Heep and Rainbow.

The third album promises to be an even further trip into the depths of early heavy metal as the song writing matures and this well oiled machine that is Space In Time works harder and harder to bring you on the most authentic, head-banging, mind-bending, sonic trip to the early ‘70s... now.

Reverend Deadeye

The Reverend Deadeye is the Reverend’s son of a Reverend’s son. He spent his youth handlin’ snakes and performin’ at tent revivals alongside his Pentecostal family on the Navajo reservation in Arizona. This sacred musical heritage finds its way prominently into his performances. But don’t expect a Sunday mornin’ church service; instead, expect a Saturday night baptism with fire holy rollin’ revival. With his modified wok-lid resonator guitar, homemade beer can microphone, kick drum, and washtub snare, he delivers a punk-rock version of gritty pre-war delta blues which he blends with fiery gospel interpretations capable of turnin’ the whole room into a spirit filled bar room revival.

Chella Negro
Originally from La Crosse, Wisconsin, folk singer-songwriter, Chella Negro, relocated to Colorado in August of 2000. Though spending the majority of the past decade living in Denver has certainly informed her songs with a spirit that can only be lifted from the ubiquitous concrete and glass of the city, the soul of a life spent growing up in a midwestern town remains the heartbeat of the music. Therein lies the inspiration for the title of her debut album, “Silos & Smokestacks.” On “Silos & Smokestacks,” the seemingly mutually exclusive elements of country heart and urban savvy fuse seamlessly into a collection of songs that is at once unique and comfortingly familiar. Having attempted to record the album previously in Brooklyn, NY, and with full band instrumentation, Chella scraped the early recordings in favor of a sound more representative of the spirit of her music; the only instruments to be found are her guitar and her voice. And reflected in her singing simultaneously are the pain of heartbreak, the joy and wonder of life, and the wisdom gained from experiencing both. Chella Negro’s first statement is years in the making and faithfully carries the torch of singer-songwriter folk music past and current.